Conference on Nonlinearity and Coherent Structures

There was a conference with the above named title in Reading University (http://www.ima.org.uk/conferences/conferences_calendar/nonlinearity_and_coherent_structures.cfm). I presented my stuff with pressure distributions in all three scales, linear, weakly nonlinear and fully nonlinear with pretty pictures too. There were some very interesting talks, I would say that around 50% went over my head, it was split into either water waves or optics (there are examples of solitary waves in each). I was somewhat annoyed with my talk as it was the last but one talk in the conference, so many of te speakers had gone by the time I had finished my talk.

Apparently all the talks are going to be put up on the website, so keep a look out for mine…

Floating fluids

Well I have completed the first stage of the analysis, the linear and weakly nonlinear cases. I just have to make the notation a little more clear and that should be a part of a chapter for my thesis which is nice. I may add a little bit on the numerics and then I am sorted, I can go on to what could possibly be my “main” problem where I can get some serious maths done.

Speaking of numerics though, I finally figured out where my bug was and as I suspected it was something simple. I used an equation to pick out the correct variable in my array and that is where the problem was. I have since used an if elseif statement which works beautifully. I have some rather dull number crunching to get some pretty looking waves.

Floating Fluids

I have my new problem to work on, it links in to some experimental work that some woman has been doing in France when he has been trying to make a fluid stick to an upturned electrode. I am top model the simple case when the diode, fluid and air are all dielectrics. I am supposed to look for waves in the solution and attack the linear and weakly nonlinear cases using the inviscid Euler equations and then move to to the viscous case which might be quite interesting. I come out of industry to learn lots of different mathematical techniques that I could take back into industry and be useful.